Laurence Aëgerter — Special Edition during Amsterdam Art Gallery Weekend 2020

A new initiative by Amsterdam Art is the release of the Special Editions. Each participating gallery presents an extraordinary and affordable limited edition artwork. Galerie Caroline O’Breen presents Healing Plants for Hurt Landscapes – Digitalis ambigua i.a. – Normandy, France (print + book) by Laurence Aëgerter

 

Edition of 30 (print), edition of 1.000 (book)
Price (print+book): €275,- including VAT
Print: 24,5 x 20 cm, ultrachrome print, framed in off white fineer on aluminum with museum glass
Book: 35,9 × 29,5 cm, 56 pages, 2015, designed by Erik Kessels

 

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About the Amsterdam Art Gallery Weekend 2020 Special Editions

The artworks are on show in every gallery and together they form an exhibition throughout the city. Artists were inspired by the overarching theme Infra-Ordinary, which describes the phenomenon when the banality of everyday life suddenly gets a special meaning. Infra-ordinary is a way to describe the magic that lies within the banality of everyday life when the main focus is not a big event, but your living room is.

For some of us, the lockdown had the side effect of a certain renewed attention to the everyday. As public life largely came to a standstill and the radius of action reduced radically, the reflection did not focus on the big events and headlines, but on what is normally overlooked. It’s the musings about what happens when very little happens. For example, trivial details can take on enormous proportions. A trip through the room can make for special finds. The French philosopher Georges Perec called this phenomenon ‘infra-ordinary’. Neither banal nor extraordinary. It is a form of excessive attention that reveals the accidental miraculous, but also the tragedy of nullity.

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About Healing Plants for Hurt Landscapes

Healing Plants for Hurt Landscapes is an offspring of Herbarium Cataplasma, a two-fold community art project that Laurence Aëgerter did at the invitation of the city of Leeuwarden in Friesland, the Netherlands. Aëgerter led a careful reconstruction of the plan of the medicinal garden of the medieval Abbey of Saint Gall on an unused plot of land in Leeuwarden which was once part of a convent. This project was realized in collaboration with the local residents, invited by the artist for a symbolical healing ritual of destroyed landscapes.

Aëgerter selected 100 images by searching Google for news photographs of a diversity of disasters in different parts of the world. Aëgerter took photographs of these landscapes to be healed. Participants were then invited to treat these landscapes with the medicinal plants from the garden, each one with the appropriate antidote found in the library or by through their own experience (e.g. ginger against pain in burns). Through these plants and landscapes became merged into a new image. These images appear in the form of a newspaper, as well as a series of large photographs.

Laurence Aëgerter — Special Edition during Amsterdam Art Gallery Weekend 2020